who is looking for a comeback?…..LLcoolJ and Kmart, thats who

It just so happens that I am looking to make a career change….when this comes along. Decided….fork lift driver it is!

Watch this….ALL of this…trust me

americanguide:

CATS AND DOGS - SOUTHEAST UNITED STATES

Lazy during the day, the dog frisks like an excited puppy at night when lanterns are refilled or carbide headlights brought out for a hunt. Padding down a dim trail, he suddenly jerks his nose to the ground and snuffles anxiously, his soft nose making little noises over each stick and leaf; then his quavering, exultant baying floats across the swamp. 

Arkansas, A Guide To the State (WPA, 1941)

"Cats is the devil’s own and they’ll sure steal the soul of the departed if they can get up into the coffin."

Tennessee, A Guide To the State (WPA, 1939)

Animals are a part of our daily life. There is the occasional exotic pet and I’ve met my fair share of mule lovers, but for the most part, we live with our domesticated pals: cats and dogs.
A portion of the pet-loving population enjoys showing off their companions and their skills or perfect proportions. My two favorite events to walk with the animals are cat shows and coondog treeings.
A cat show is the more quiet of the two. Cats are fascinating. I am constantly reminded in the dealings with my cat Mad Max that they are the only species to domesticate themselves, preferring the interior protected life to the chaos and dangers of outdoors. 
Cat shows are most often held in hotels and fairground buildings. Each cat gets an allotted space at one of the long tables. Their person makes them as comfortable as possible in this foreign space brimming with new smells. Some fluffy cats snooze in the cage with fancy curtains shrouding their enclosure and some, like the super chatty Tonkinese (a sleek muscular breed who often do gravity defying flips), interact with their person—extending up a paw to touch a face or bat at a brush. 
Divisions and classes are called and cats are brought up and put in their spaces to await the judge. Cat show judges are a beauty to behold. The best judges can focus the cat’s energy on them to show their bright eyes and unique personality by using the perfect hushed coo or an irresistible stick and feather. After a quick tally, ribbons are hung and reasonings are provided with a flourish of staccato language describing what made the top felines stand out.
Far from the hushed tones and orange glow of fluorescent light, coondogs are baying in the harsh light of day. The dogs are used to excitement in the middle of the night. Raccoons are nocturnal and are more active in the moonlight, so that is when the hound normally gets to play. In the event of a treeing contest, they are out in the daylight in front of hundreds. 
A special tree is chosen, or temporarily erected under a tent, to be THE tree. Dogs are registered and put in divisions. (If betting is to take place there is a round at the beginning to introduce the dogs to the crowd. The dogs are bid on and some are chosen for hundreds of dollars. Most often in a betting situation at least half, if not all, money is given to charity.) 
Then the noise begins. A raccoon, either real and frazzled or stuffed and drenched in scent, is caged. The first dog enters the circle around the tree. The handler shakes the cage in front of the dog (sometimes with a hiss from the man or the raccoon) and another man then pulls back on the rope to hoist the creature up the tree to mimic a hunting situation. The dog reacts. Some roff, roff, roff, roff, while lobbing up the tree into somewhat ungraceful flips. Some do long low bays, aroooroororoororroorooroororoooroooroooro while standing at attention. Then, some get distracted by the crowd and trot along the edges of the circle goofily looking out at the people or simply sit and just don’t bark.
During the minute, the crowd is utterly silent and the four judges listen carefully, calculating the bpm or barks per minute. The crowd responds after each dog, cheering wildly a high bark count or young hunters regardless of how their dog did, while the judges confer and average their counts. Ribbons are given and bet money is dispersed.
As the French poet Anatole France remarked, “Until one has loved an animal a part of one’s soul remains unawakened.” Cats and dogs hold a special place in the heart with probably the most pure love one can have for another being. They live in the moment, don’t hold grudges or feel ill will, and reflect the best parts of ourselves back to us. Consider spending the day with a fancy feline or black and tan.
* * *

Tammy Mercure is a State Guide to Tennessee. She was recently named one of the “100 under 100: The New Superstars of Southern Art” by Oxford American magazine.

Follow on Tumblr at tammymercure or on her website,TammyMercure.com. Support her work at TCB Press.

americanguide:

BRISTOL, TENNESSEE/VIRGINIA - (On the Occasion of My Departure)

The city is split down the middle. You can stand on State Street with one foot in Virginia and one foot in Tennessee and look up at the giant glowing sign that reads modestly, “Bristol: A Good Place to Live.” From 1910 to 1921, the sign read, “PUSH!- That’s Bristol,” a much more fitting and eccentric slogan for the odd and charming city.

On an average day, Clayton, a bearded man in fatigues sits checking his iPad while sitting on a bench downtown. He scans the block giving knowing nods to his friends in passing. He has chosen to live a life jumping trains and living in tents using a solar plug-in to charge his one electronic device. Around the corner, burgers are flipped at the Burger Bar where Hank Williams may or may not have eaten his last meal. (I have always imagined not, which makes the food more appetizing.) A man walks his giant pot bellied pig, passing a beautiful older woman wearing a fox fur coat while a group of girls giggle and run across the street.

It is a city that marks the passing of the year with parades and festivals. Displays for the 4th of July are erected out of soda boxes at the grocery store, people march in groups for the Christmas parade and hundreds of children hunt for Easter eggs in the park.

Like any good Southern town, the place becomes more complex the longer you stay. You learn that those who might be considered “loiterers” hang out on the Virginia side of the street so they only have a five minute walk back after a quick trip to jail, as opposed to a 40 minute drive on the Tennessee side. You find the local routes to the Speedway on the crazy race weeks, thus avoiding the temporary invasion force of 150,000 extra Bristol residents. You find out who makes moonshine in their basement and that you can enter Steele Creek Park via Rooster Front to be closer to the waterfall.

For good and bad, everyone eventually knows everyone. Most private business is semi-public. Everyone knows why a certain company downtown ran out of money and whose rich daddy is paying for it to keep running so his listless prodigal son stays busy and out of trouble. On the other hand, when tragedy strikes, the community rallies. Casseroles are delivered and ears are bent—or if the situation is too grave for words, arms intertwine.

I lived in Bristol for four years and I will miss it. On the small highways leaving the city, you will often see pairs of shoes thrown over the electric lines. Around here, that means you have moved on and the shoes are left behind as an offering. Being flat footed and having trouble finding comfortable shoes, I metaphorically left a pair. I will be forever grateful to this weird city where most people are passionate about something and always said yes to getting a portrait made.

* * *

Tammy Mercure is a State Guide to Tennessee. She was recently named one of the “100 under 100: The New Superstars of Southern Art” by Oxford American magazine.

Follow on Tumblr at tammymercure or on her website, TammyMercure.com. Support her work at TCB Press.

various raw lighting setups from in-class demos this week

kingcollegephoto:

It’s here. Wednesday night 6pm Bristol library. Be there. Free screening and Q&A for Your Name is My Name.
We are hanging out with Osato and Peter in class Thursday. Please take a look at Peter’s editing: http://www.ppohio.com/portfolio.html (the brownish text brings up the videos) so you will have questions for him. Also check out a sampling of Osato’s other projects at White Whale: http://thewhitewhale.net/main.html. 

kingcollegephoto:

It’s here. Wednesday night 6pm Bristol library. Be there. Free screening and Q&A for Your Name is My Name.

We are hanging out with Osato and Peter in class Thursday. Please take a look at Peter’s editing: http://www.ppohio.com/portfolio.html (the brownish text brings up the videos) so you will have questions for him. Also check out a sampling of Osato’s other projects at White Whale: http://thewhitewhale.net/main.html

kingcollegephoto:

Join us -
FRIDAY MARCH 8th, 2013 from 6-9pm for Downtown Bristol’s Popular Art D’Vine Gallery HopKing University Photo Department will present two exhibits during this event.The first exhibition is at CityMug’s Student Gallery located at 629 State Street. The photography by Josh Hutton and Nicole Poyo explores the idea of place. Hutton’s photographs highlight the beautiful lush landscapes of Northern Ireland where he spent a semester studying abroad. Poyo’s work shows the land use and inner workings of a cattle ranch in middle Tennessee.The second exhibition is at the One Night Stand Gallery, currently located at Believe in Bristol’s office at 36 Moore Street. The exhibit explores the joy of photography and the unique things the medium can do like play with scale, freeze motion, and capture light. The exhibiting artists are Jesse Cheers, John Klink, and Tessa Klingensmith. Students - This is for convo credit!! Hope to see you there.  There will be wine and snacks and the artists at both places.

kingcollegephoto:

Join us -

FRIDAY MARCH 8th, 2013 from 6-9pm for Downtown Bristol’s Popular Art D’Vine Gallery Hop
King University Photo Department will present two exhibits during this event.

The first exhibition is at CityMug’s Student Gallery located at 629 State Street. The photography by Josh Hutton and Nicole Poyo explores the idea of place. Hutton’s photographs highlight the beautiful lush landscapes of Northern Ireland where he spent a semester studying abroad. Poyo’s work shows the land use and inner workings of a cattle ranch in middle Tennessee.

The second exhibition is at the One Night Stand Gallery, currently located at Believe in Bristol’s office at 36 Moore Street. The exhibit explores the joy of photography and the unique things the medium can do like play with scale, freeze motion, and capture light. The exhibiting artists are Jesse Cheers, John Klink, and Tessa Klingensmith.

Students - This is for convo credit!! Hope to see you there.  There will be wine and snacks and the artists at both places.

tammymercure:

If you are in the area on Wednesday March 13th, 2013, please plan on coming to a screening of Your Name is My Name. It is an amazing documentary about albinos in Zimbabwe. Both the director, Osato Dixon, and the editor, Peter Galassi, will be present for a Q&A after the film.

See the trailer here.

various raw lighting setups from this weeks in-class demos

King College Photo: LOOK3 tickets are now on sale. This year the Festival of the...

kingcollegephoto:

image

LOOK3 tickets are now on sale. This year the Festival of the Photograph is featuring Gregory Crewdson, Josef Koudelka, Susan Meiselas, Richard Misrach, Carrie Mae Weems and Nick Nichols.

That is the most wonderful lineup I have seen in years. You do NOT want to miss this. King…

If Birds Could Fly @ Bristol Rhythm & Roots Festival 2012 from King College Photo on Vimeo.

An in-studio musical performance by Andrew and Brittany of If Birds Could Fly as they visited the King College Photo and Social Media Center during the 2012 Bristol Rhythm and Roots festival.

Interview by Ryan Bernard.

KingCollegePhoto.com

If Birds Could Fly @ Bristol Rhythm & Roots Festival 2012 from King College Photo on Vimeo.

An in-studio musical performance by Andrew and Brittany of If Birds Could Fly as they visited the King College Photo and Social Media Center during the 2012 Bristol Rhythm and Roots festival.

Interview by Ryan Bernard.

KingCollegePhoto.com